Monday, March 24, 2008

Saturday, March 22, 2008

Take Action

Below is a comment that I lifted from another article about blowback from an attempt to have an outside analysis of anomalies that occurred in New Jersey during recent voting.

I condemn these electronic voting machines. See the video testimony of a computer programmer who was solicited to make fraudulent software as he testifies before Congress. It can be found on my campaign pages at, or at
E-voting machines were hacked in 90 seconds on live television. They are unreliable vote fraud generating junk. By the public nature of elections, voting machine software and source code is public domain. I demand that our 2008 elections be monitored by responsible authorities and the source code published on the internet or the machines banned from this nation.
Call your senators from New Jersey and tell them that you will not vote on electronic voting machines. This is an outrage.
Read the entire comment, and the article…

This comment boils the issue down to the bare bones of what this discussion should ultimately be about.
E-voting machines…are unreliable vote fraud generating junk that is used election after election to pervert the will of the voters, and give an official position to undeserving party loyalists (or corporate loyalists, if you prefer) like Norm Coleman, George W. Bush (second term), or anyone else sympathetic to big business.
By the very nature of elections in a democracy, voting machine software and source code is public domain, and should be available for inspection and severe scrutiny by any and all. The companies claiming proprietary rights in the election arena should be brought to account for the crimes they have visited upon the American public, and their management structure prosecuted to the full extent of the law (under a court that is not in the same pocket they are).

The problems with e-voting have been recognized, well documented, and summarily ignored by the majority of Congress long enough to understand that an entrenched politician is not fazed by the prospect or threat of losing my vote, so I will vote for the most progressive Democrat on the ticket, and hope that we can once again fill Congress with the voice of the people.

In the meantime, put together a list of the criminals and their enablers. The Bush courts might not feel a need to prosecute on behalf of the American people, but the penalties for crapping on our Constitution will be severe never-the-less.

When it becomes apparent that this Government thinks its only important function is to show us (the citizens) why we hinge in the middle, I am going to start visiting those responsible to clearly voice my disapproval. Until then, I will vote….

Monday, March 17, 2008

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Petition for Better Reporting of Drug Side Effects

I support requiring all drug ads to include a 1-800 number and website so citizens can report drug side effects (petition docket 2008P-0012/CP1).

All too often, drug advertisements fail to present the benefits and risks of using prescription drugs in an accurate and balanced way. It is often the newest drugs that are the most heavily advertised, and it is these drugs whose side effects we know the least about.

The current system for collecting information about side effects catches only a fraction of actual cases. The recent law passed to require print drug ads to provide a 1-800 number and website (FDAAA -- P.L. 110-85) is a step in the right direction, but should be extended to include TV ads which are viewed far more frequently and with a greater command of the viewing audience.
Increased reporting of adverse events will help in the earlier detection and better analysis of problems. All television ads should contain information on how patients can report side effects to the FDA.

Click the link below and take action now!